Benefits of the Propeller Platform

Since day one, Propeller has insisted on outcomes.

The effectiveness of Propeller has been demonstrated across diverse geographies, settings and patient populations.

See our peer-reviewed research

60+

clinical studies

4500+

study participants

35+

peer reviewed studies

family members looking at the Propeller app and sensor

Outcomes for Patients with Asthma

Improved Medication Adherence

Propeller provides consistently higher levels of medication adherence. Improved medication adherence may lead to a reduced risk of asthma exacerbations.1

 

Over six months, patients using Propeller had 58% higher adherence than those in the control group.2

  • chart illustrating controller medication adherence improvement of 58% over six months
    Study design

    Randomized controlled trial

  • participants
    Participants

    125 adults with asthma

Read abstract

improved-medication-ad-chart
 

Based on objectively collected sensor data, controller-to-total medication ratio improved from 0.66 to 0.82, reflecting a shift towards higher adherence.3

Read paper

study-design

Study design

Pre-post quality improvement program

participants

Participants

224 patients with asthma

Reduced Rescue Inhaler Usage

Propeller has demonstrated reductions in rescue inhaler use in a number of studies and populations. Reductions in rescue inhaler use can be associated with better asthma control, more days without symptoms and a better quality of life.

 

In a clinical setting, mean daily rescue inhaler use was reduced by 84% over 12 months.4

  • study-design
    Study design

    Randomized controlled trial

  • participants
    Participants

    495 adults and children with asthma

Read paper

chart illustrating mean daily rescue inhaler use reduction by 84%
 

Propeller users experienced a 78% reduction in rescue inhaler use over 12 months.5

  • study-design
    Study design

    Population based observational study

  • chart illustrating 78% reduction in rescue inhaler use over 12 months
    Participants

    497 adults and children with asthma

Read paper

asthma-rescue-usage-chart

Return on Investment

Research shows that uncontrolled asthma is expensive for patients, employers, payers and clinicians.6

$1,349per patient

Estimated annual excess direct costs associated with uncontrolled asthma

12.7%

Amount of work time lost compared with a person with controlled asthma

6.6 weeks

Lost productivity during a year

 

72% of participants using Propeller achieved asthma control (as defined by the Asthma Control TestTM 7) including 63% of adults who were initially uncontrolled.4

Read paper

study-design

Study design

Randomized controlled trial

participants

Participants

495 adults and children with asthma

Reduced Healthcare Utilization

As Propeller users improve their medication adherence and asthma control, they may experience fewer hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits resulting in reduced healthcare costs.

 

Over 12 months, ED visits were reduced by 53% and ED visits and hospitalizations were reduced by 57%.3

  • study-design
    Study design

    Pre-post quality improvement program

  • chart illustrating ed visit reduction by 53% over 12 months and ed hospitalization reduction by 57% over 12 months
    Participants

    224 children and adults with asthma

Read paper

reduced-healthcare-ut-chart

Outcomes for Patients with COPD

Reduced Rescue Inhaler Usage

Reductions in rescue inhaler use may indicate more days without symptoms and a better quality of life.

At 12 months of use, Propeller users saw8:

36% absolute improvement in rescue inhaler-free days

absolute improvement in rescue inhaler-free days

63% reduction in mean rescue inhaler puffs per day

reduction in mean rescue inhaler puffs per day

73% reduction in nighttime rescue inhaler use

reduction in nighttime rescue inhaler use

  • study-design
    Study design

    Quality improvement program

  • chart illustrating reduction in rescue inhaler usage over 12 months
    Participants

    190 Medicare-eligible adults with COPD

Read paper

copd-outcomes-chart

Identification of COPD Patients at High Risk

Data from the Propeller platform may help identify patients at greater risk of a COPD exacerbation, allowing clinicians to intervene to prevent a hospitalization or ED visit.

 

Over three months, 48 exacerbation events were observed in 29 participants. During these moderate-to-severe exacerbation days, average daily rescue use increased by 14.1%. A doubling in rescue inhaler use was associated with 54% increased odds of a moderate-to severe exacerbation. In another analysis, rescue inhaler overuse was associated with greater disease severity and more dyspnea.9,10

Read paper

study-design

Study design

Prospective cohort study

participants

Participants

35 patients with moderate-to-severe COPD

Reduced Healthcare Utilization

In 2010, the cost of COPD in the USA was approximately $50 billion. This included $20 billion in indirect costs and $30 billion in direct health care expenditures, with hospital stays accounting for the majority of these costs.11

 

In conjunction with disease management, COPD-related healthcare utilization was reduced by 35%.12

  • chart illustrating COPD-related healthcare utilization was reduced by 35%
    Study design

    Pre-post quality improvement study

  • participants
    Participants

    39 patients with COPD who had at least one healthcare utilization (ED visit or hospitalization) in the past 12 months

Read paper

chart illustrating 79% of users being very satisfied with the inhaler sensor device while 20% reported being somewhat satisfied

Patient Satisfaction

Patients with asthma and COPD expressed high levels of satisfaction with the Propeller experience.

Upon completion of a randomized controlled study of adults and children with asthma, 89 participants who received the intervention completed a satisfaction survey.

Of these 89 participants, 79% reported being very satisfied with the inhaler sensor device, while 20% reported being somewhat satisfied.13

patient-satisfaction-chart

In addition, 93% expressed satisfaction with the reports, 90% found the information from the reports useful for learning about their asthma and 72% reported that they were interested in continuing to use the sensor and platform beyond the study.13

Read paper

  • 84%

    In a retrospective study of participants with COPD, 84% (16/19) reported being highly satisfied or satisfied with the inhaler sensor device and monitoring.12

    Read paper

  • 74%

    In a 3-month prospective study of participants with moderate-to-severe COPD, 74% (23/31) of participants reported satisfaction with the inhaler sensor device.9

    Read paper

girl-with-sensor-phone

Contact Us

 

If you have a proposal for research collaboration, email [email protected].

If you'd like to learn more about Propeller for your patients or members, complete the form below.

 

1 Delea, T. E., Stanford, R. H., Hagiwara, M., & Stempel, D. A. (2008). Association between adherence with fixed dose combination fluticasone propionate/salmeterol on asthma outcomes and costs. Current medical research and opinion, 24(12), 3435-3442.

2 Van Sickle, D., Barrett, M., Humblet, O., Henderson, K., & Hogg, C. (2016). Randomized, controlled study of the impact of a mobile health tool on asthma SABA use, control and adherence.

3 Merchant, R., Szefler, S. J., Bender, B. G., Tuffli, M., Barrett, M. A., Gondalia, R., ... & Stempel, D. A. (2018). Impact of a digital health intervention on asthma resource utilization. World Allergy Organization Journal, 11(1), 1-4.

4 Merchant, R. K., Inamdar, R., & Quade, R. C. (2016). Effectiveness of population health management using the propeller health asthma platform: a randomized clinical trial. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, 4(3), 455-463.

5 Barrett, M., Combs, V., Su, J. G., Henderson, K., Tuffli, M., & AIR Louisville Collaborative. (2018). AIR Louisville: addressing asthma with technology, crowdsourcing, cross-sector collaboration, and policy. Health Affairs, 37(4), 525-534.

6 Yaghoubi, M., Adibi, A., Safari, A., FitzGerald, J. M., & Sadatsafavi, M. (2019). The projected economic and health burden of uncontrolled asthma in the United States. American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine, 200(9), 1102-1112.

7 The Asthma Control TestTM (ACTTM) is a five-question patient survey used to measure asthma control. The survey measures the elements of asthma control as defined by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI).

8 Chen, J., Kaye, L., Tuffli, M., Barrett, M. A., Jones-Ford, S., Shenouda, T., ... & Stempel, D. A. (2019). Passive monitoring of short-acting beta-agonist use via digital platform in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: quality improvement retrospective analysis. JMIR formative research, 3(4), e13286.

9 Sumino, K., Locke, E. R., Magzamen, S., Gylys-Colwell, I., Humblet, O., Nguyen, H. Q., ... & Fan, V. S. (2018). Use of a remote inhaler monitoring device to measure change in inhaler use with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations. Journal of aerosol medicine and pulmonary drug delivery, 31(3), 191-198.

10 Fan, V. S., Gylys-Colwell, I., Locke, E., Sumino, K., Nguyen, H. Q., Thomas, R. M., & Magzamen, S. (2016). Overuse of short-acting beta-agonist bronchodilators in COPD during periods of clinical stability. Respiratory Medicine, 116, 100-106.

11 Guarascio, A. J., Ray, S. M., Finch, C. K., & Self, T. H. (2013). The clinical and economic burden of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the USA. ClinicoEconomics and outcomes research: CEOR, 5, 235.

12 Alshabani, K., Attaway, A. A., Smith, M. J., Majumdar, U., Rice, R., Han, X., ... & Hatipo─člu, U. (2019). Electronic inhaler monitoring and healthcare utilization in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, 1357633X19850404.

13 Merchant, R., Inamdar, R., Henderson, K., Barrett, M., Su, J. G., Riley, J., ... & Stempel, D. (2018). Digital health intervention for asthma: patient-reported value and usability. JMIR mHealth and uHealth, 6(6), e133.